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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • March 13, 1963

    Cable from the CCPCC International Liaison Department and the Foreign Ministry, 'Key Points of the Conversation from Chairman of the CCP CC Comrade Mao Zedong’s Reception of the Soviet Ambassador to China Comrade Chernovenko'

    Mao Zedong discusses the relationship between China and the Soviet Union and the debate between the two Parties, proposes a meeting for fraternal discussion, and commits to countering Western imperialism.

  • September, 1963

    Mao Zedong, 'There Are Two Intermediate Zones'

    Mao Zedong begins to espouse his theory of the “Two Intermediate Zones,” with Asia, Africa, and Latin America constituting the first, and Europe and North America constituting the second.

  • 1964

    The Situation Surrounding the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France and Related Issues

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reviews the process of the normalization of relations between China and France and speculates how the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and France might affect China's status in the United Nations and with the UK, Europe, Africa, and Japan.

  • January 15, 1964

    The Chinese Government's Eight Principles for Economic Aid and Technical Assistance to Other Countries

    During a state visit to Ghana in January 1964, Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai outlines the principles of China's foreign economic assistance.

  • June 29, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Premier Zhou Talked about the Relationship between China-Soviet Difference and the National Liberation Movement'

    Account of Zhou's conversation with Kenyan officials, including discussions of the Sino-Soviet debate, imperialist manipulation of the debate, and enhanced US pressure in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

  • October 16, 1964

    Statement of the Government of the People's Republic of China

    The Government of China announces its successful nuclear test but states that it will follow a no first use policy and in fact desires for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons.

  • January 18, 1965

    Memorandum of Discussions between Romanian Worker’s Party leadership and Polish United Worker’s Party leadership

    The talks focus on several issues: namely the Multinational Nuclear Forces, Warsaw Pact relations with Albania, and the People's Republic of China. Gomulka and Dej also discuss the idea of convening a conference of Communist and Worker’s parties.

  • March 26, 1965

    Minutes of Todor Zhivkov – Raul Castro Meeting in Sofia

    Zhivkov lays out his perspective on the place of Bulgaria within the Communist Camp. He also talks about the Balkans and the rift between Bulgaria and Romania. Both leaders discuss the Chinese accusations of Soviet Revisionism. Raul Castro talks about the strength of the communist movements in Latin America and the prospects for successful social revolutions in Venezuela, Chile, Costa Rica, Uruguay, and Brazil.

  • May 28, 1965

    Discussion between Zhou Enlai and Indonesian Prime Minister Subandrio

    Zhou Enlai outlines the Chinese reaction should the US expand the Vietnam War into China, reassuring Subandrio that should the war enter China, his country is prepared to retaliate.

  • July 24, 1965

    Minutes of Conversation between Deng Xiaoping and Head of the Korean Delegation Kim Gwang-hyeop

    The Chinese and Korean Delegation in Bucharest exchange information about their visits in Eastern Europe, discussions with the Romanians, the situation in Yugoslavia and Albania, and the possibility of holding the Afro-Asian Conference.

  • January 09, 1966

    Secret Letter from the Indian Embassy in Beijing to the Foreign Secretary in New Delhi, No. PEK/104/66, 'China and the West'

    The Indian Embassy in Beijing sent a letter to the Indian Foreign Secretary to prove an analysis of Chinese foreign policy, such as Beijing's relationship with the West and the impact of Sino-Soviet split on Chinese foreign relations.

  • January 11, 1966

    Bulgarian Politburo Resolution on Intelligence Actions Against China and Albania

    CC BCP Politburo approves Angel Solakov’s recommendation the State Security Committee to commence intelligence and counter-intelligence operations against PRC and Albania. In an attached report Solakov lays out the rationale for such actions. Solakov cites cases where the Chinese and Albanian intelligence services have allegedly embarked upon anti-Soviet actions in various countries of Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America.

  • August 14, 1966

    Note from the Conversation between Ambassador Jerzy Knothe and Prime Minister Zhou Enlai during the ambassador’s farewell visit, August 14, 1966

    Ambassador Jerzy Knothe and Prime Minister Zhou Enlai discuss ongoing Chinese class struggles.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • March 23, 1967

    Bulgarian State Security Chairman Angel Solakov’s Report at a Bulgarian Communist Party Plenum

    According to the State Security Committee chair, Angel Solakov, there has been a major shift in the policies of the West towards the Soviet bloc. While during the 1950s military face-off was often considered an option, in the late 1960s such possibility has been largely ruled out. Consequently the US and their allies in Western Europe are focusing their efforts on fighting socialism around the world through peaceful means, such as strengthening economic and cultural ties with the Soviet bloc countries. This calls for a change in the strategy of the State Security Committee intelligence operations. Solakov also reports on the anti-Soviet activities of the Chinese and Albanian intelligence services across Europe.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • January 04, 1968

    Report by the Bulgarian Foreign Minister on the Ministerial Meeting in Warsaw on the Situation in the Middle East, 19-21 December 1967

    Ivan Bashev presents a report on the CPSU-organized meeting in Warsaw, where Eastern European government officials exchanged views on the situation in the Middle East. Among the discussed topics were the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Yemeni Civil War, and recent developments in Iraq.

  • May 06, 1968

    Cable from the CSSR Embassy, Peking, 'Thesis and Proposals for the Development of an Action Plan of the Communist Party and Government of Czechoslovakia regarding the Relations between Czechoslovakia and Chinese People’s Republic'

    Proposals for Communist Party action regarding the CPR activity, including overall objectives in the CSSR-PRC relationship, general foreign policy outlook, and specific measures like fighting against the theory of "two Chinas."

  • July 08, 1968

    Political Report No.12 from the Embassy of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, Peking

    Account addressed to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding gradual normalization of communications and relations with China, including conclusions and recommendations for future policy like removal of limits on free movement by the Chinese representative office in Prague.

  • September 07, 1968

    CSSR Embassy Peking, 'Position of the Chinese People’s Republic regarding the Occupation of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, Comments in CPR Press and the Attitude of CPR Organs toward Our Representative Office in Peking'

    Account of the CPR's position regarding the Soviet occupation of the CSSR through press statements and statements by officials.