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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 23, 1947

    Draft of Telegram to Vyshinsky on the Korean Question

    Vyshinsky is instructed that, because the Korean issue is already on the UNSC agenda, it should remain there. Vyshinsky should stake out a position that both American and Soviet troops withdraw simultaneously, allowing the Koreans to develop a unified government. Elected representatives from both Koreas should be invited to discussions. A time span for the troop withdrawals must be set. The draft includes some scrawled recommendations from Stalin.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 293, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov writes that Vyshinsky must insist on the Koreans being invited to any discussion on removing foreign troops from Korea. If opposition to such participation holds, the Soviets should abstain from voting on the matter out of principle.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 418 from Vyshinsky

    Vyshinsky outlines the amendment that the US has introduced regarding the Korean question. Moreover, Vyshinsky asserts the plan to object to the amendment and express why the amendment is not compatible with the proposal of the Soviets.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case of opposing proposals from the US, the Soviets should oppose and abstain rather than voting against them.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram Nos. 408-411, Vyshinsky to Molotov

    Vyshinsky outlines the proceedings at the UN, where discussion of the Korean question and the withdrawal of Foreign troops from Korea has led the Soviets to insist that the Koreans be invited to the discussions. He details counter proposals from the Americans, and Soviet responses to these resolutions.

  • October 30, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee.

  • December 15, 1947

    Explanation of the Dissolution of the Indochinese Communist Party in 1945

    List of reasons for the dissolution of the Indochinese Communist Party by the Viet Minh in 1945. The list was provided by Pham Ngoc Thach while meeting with the Soviet Envoy in Switzerland A. G. Kulazhenkov in September 1947.

  • April 30, 1948

    George F. Kennan, 'The Inauguration of Organized Political Warfare' [Redacted Version]

    State Department Policy Planning Director George Kennan outlines, in a document for the National Security Council, the idea of a public committee, working closely with the US government, to sponsor various émigré activities

  • April 30, 1948

    George F. Kennan, 'The Inauguration of Organized Political Warfare'

    State Department Policy Planning Director George Kennan outlines, in a document for the National Security Council, the idea of a public committee, working closely with the US government, to sponsor various émigré activities.

  • May 17, 1948

    Memorandum from Edmund A. Gullion to J.K. Gustafson Regarding US Policy towards South Africa

    Memo from Edmund Gullion, Special Assistant to the Undersecretary, to J. K. Gustafson of the Atomic Energy Commission summarizing the most important unresolved policy issues between the U.S. and South Africa.

  • May 26, 1948

    Memorandum from J.K Gustafson to C.L. Wilson Regarding Gustafson's Conversation with Anton Gray

    Memo from J. K. Gustafson to Carroll L. Wilson, both of the US Atomic Energy Commission, regarding a conversation Anton Gray had with General Smuts, the fourth prime minister of South Africa, about South Africa's uranium development and its effect on relations with the US and the UK.

  • June 14, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Effects of Soviet Restrictions on the US Position in Berlin"

    Describes effect of Soviet restrictive measures in Berlin on US intelligence and propaganda activities and on operations of the joint military government.

  • July 11, 1948

    Record of Conversation between Kim Gu and Liu Yuwan

    Kim Gu (Kim Koo) and the Chinese Nationalist Minister Liu Yuwan discuss Kim's participation in the South Korean government, his attendance at a conference in Pyongyang, and the possibility of a Russian-led attack on southern Korea.

  • July 12, 1948

    Memo of the Directorate for Foreign Relations of the USSR Armed Forces General Staff about the Results of a Conference of Leaders of the Political Parties and Organizations of North and South Korea

    The statement describes the conference which took place in Pyongyang from June 29 to July 5. The main goal of the conference was to discuss the separate elections held in South Korea and possibilities for the unification of Korea. The North Korean representatives considered the National Assembly formed in South Korea to be illegitimate and urged for the expulsion of foreign powers in order to achieve a unified Korea.

  • September 28, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Consequences of a Breakdown in Four-Power Negotiations on Germany"

    Summarizes Soviet objectives and strategies in entering into Four-Power discussions about Berlin and Germany.

  • October 14, 1948

    Draft Charter of Committee to Support Émigré Broadcasting [Approved for Release, February 16, 2011]

    Draft charter for an émigré-support committee, prepared by the Office of Policy Coordination official Maynard Ruddock

  • October 18, 1948

    Memorandum from A.M. Rosenson to Wendel Regarding Draft Economic Policy Statement

    Memo from Alexander M. Rosenson, chief of the monetary affairs staff at the Dept. of State, to Wendel with the economic section of the US policy agenda towards South Africa attached.

  • December 10, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Memorandum for the President on the Situation in Berlin

    CIA Memorandum for President Truman on US position on Soviet actions in Berlin.

  • December 30, 1948

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Stalin

    Mao details to Stalin the recent military operations the Communists have undertaken against the Guomindang army. The first is in the area of Suizhou, Huaiying, and the Huaihe River. The second is in Du Yuming. Mao states that once these operations are complete, he will depart for Moscow. Mao discusses future tactics against the Guomindang.

  • January 06, 1949

    Ciphered Telegram No. 0100, Stalin to Terbpin

    Stalin, through Terebin (Andrei Orlov), acknowledges that creating a democratic coalition government in China will take a significant amount of time. Stalin states, however, that it would be best if the final stages of the process take place sooner than the summer, the time Mao planned to have the government established.