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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 24, 1949

    Report, Kovalev to Stalin

    Kovalev discusses seceral questions on the policy and pratice of the CCP CC. Topics include: data on the economic situation in the country, the Chinese working class, the Chinese peasantry and the land reform, the CCP, the Chinese press, the Chinese state apparatus, the Chinese army, the Chinese intelligentsia, the Chinese attitude toward the national bourgeoisie, the Chinese attitude toward foreign capital, the class struggle in China, and Chinese foreign policy.

  • January 10, 1950

    Material on the Conspiratorial Activities of US Vice-Consul in Dihua

  • January 11, 1950

    Discovered US Consulate Reactionary Acts

    A list of items that the Chinese captured from the US consulate in Dihua (Urumqi), Xinjiang.

  • January 13, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong cables to Liu Shaoqi regarding the status of US property and institutions in China, the situation in Hong Kong, and Chinese representation at the United Nations.

  • January 18, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong gives Liu Shaoqi guidance on Chinese foreign policy towards the United States and Great Britain.

  • March 16, 1950

    Request to State Department for information on Eastern Europe for Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    Office of Policy Coordination requests information – negative and positive – from the State Department on conditions in Eastern Europe that could be used in Radio Free Europe broadcasts.

  • April 07, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 8/2, "Position of the United States with Respect to Korea"

    Report by the National Security Council to the President on US policy objectives regarding Korea.

  • April 14, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 68, 'United States Objectives and Programs for National Security'

    On US national security policy at the beginning of the Cold War. Includes an assessment of the conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union, as well as US and Soviet nuclear weapons capabilities.

  • April 26, 1950

    Recommendations on Utilization of the Russian Emigration

    Robert F. Kelley expands the recommendation of his May 3, 1949 memorandum ["Kelley Memorandum on Utilization of Russian Political Émigrés"] that the Office of Policy Coordination encourage the “existing striving of the Russian émigrés to create a central unifying organization” that would organize broadcast to the Soviet Union and be supported through a Free Europe Committee-llike committee in the United States.

  • May 05, 1950

    Statement of US Policy Toward Eastern Europe

    The Office of Policy Coordination provides the Free Europe Committee with State Department policy guidance dated April 26, 1950, calling for a range of diplomatic and information initiatives, including use of émigrés, but cautioning that broadcasts “should not promise imminent liberation or encourage active revolt.”

  • June 19, 1950

    Letter, Owen Lattimore to Lennox C. Fogg, Jr.

    Lattimore forwards a letter from three exiled leaders from Xinjiang, and hints at Senator Joseph McCarthy's attacks on his character.

  • June 27, 1950

    Statement by the President, Truman on Korea

    Truman's statement on the invasion of South Korea by North Korean forces.

  • August 10, 1950

    Office of Policy Coordination Provides Propaganda Themes for Radio Free Europe

    The Office of Policy Coordination provides the Free Europe Committee with four suggested propaganda themes for RFE broadcasts.

  • August 16, 1950

    Untitled report on a British-American-Lebanese effort to combat communism

    Information on secret communications between American, British and Arab ministers to establish a section to combat communism in Lebanon and the Levant.

  • August 21, 1950

    Office of Policy Coordination and Kennan Discussion of the American Committee for Liberation

    Frank Wisner solicits George Kennan’s suggestions on the organization of AMCOMLIB (cryptonym Cinderella) and the composition of its board of directors.

  • September 09, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 81/1, "United States Courses of Action with Respect to Korea"

    The National Security Council reports to President Truman on possible US courses of action in resposne to the North Korean invasion of South Korea.

  • September 23, 1950

    CPSU Politburo Decision to Adopt the Attached Draft Response

    Telegram telling Vyshinsky to inform Lancaster that Malik consented to a meeting with the assistant Ahesona or one of the American ambassadors, as suggested by Lancaster. Malik should listen to the State Department official and if it's evident that the Americans are taking a step forward towards a peaceful settlement of the Korean question, tell him that Malik should ponder the issues mentioned in the conversation.

  • September 27, 1950

    Telegram from Feng Xi (Stalin) to Matveyev (Razuvayev V.N.) and T.F. Shtykov

    Stalin blames the recent success of the UN forces in Seoul on the inefficiency of the KPA’s Frontline Command and Soviet military advisors, as well erroneous use of tank tactics and overall combat strategy. Stalin provides a detailed list instructing military advisors, and especially Vasilyev, how to delpoy and manage Korean troops around Seoul.

  • September 28, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram from Gromyko to Vyshisnky in New York

    Gromyko asks Vyshinsky to get Tsarapkin to inform American intermediary Lancaster that Malik has agreed to the meeting. Malik must hear out the Americans and if it seems that they're willing to work towards a peaceful resolution, tell Lancaster that any questions that the Americans had during this discussion will be answered in the next meeting.

  • September 30, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, from Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-Yeong to Stalin (via Shtykov)

    Telegram from Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong telling Stalin of the losses they have incurred following American air and ground attacks in South Korea and of their general lack of supplies and trained personnel.