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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 30 October 1962

    Jelen continues his analysis of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Fidel Castro, after his first contacts with Brazilian President João Goulart’s special envoy Albino Silva, accepted well the Brazilian thesis which contains following: Denuclearization of the whole of Latin America and the embargo on atomic weapons delivery; Inspection by UN; Cuba would commit neither to export revolution nor to carry out any subversive activities; Cuba would be given guarantees for keeping its sovereignty and independence. The USA will accept the plan after negotiations. Russians “couldn’t think of anything better.”

  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Kuznetsov and Ambassador to the UN Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Report on a breakfast held by Zorin - chairman of the Security Council - with its members. The topics of discussion include: American agreement to the Soviet proposal for checks on vessels carried out by representatives of the International Red Cross, the Irish proposal to convene the Council right after U Thant's return from Cuba to decide on an inspection mechanism for the dismantlings, and the Ghanaian delegate's remarks on the situation in Congo.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 31 October 1962

    US Ambassador Foy D. Kohler tells Jaszczuk that "The United States will not go into Cuba and it does not intend to topple Castro from outside of Cuba."

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    The Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro tells the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about Brazil's proposal to the United Nations (denuclearization of Latin America, Cuba will not export revolutionary operations, Cuban guarantee of independence) and about how difficult it might be to implement the various aspects of this resolution. For example, when it comes to discussions of the evacuation of Guantanamo, Americans "stop their ears."

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington, 31 October 1962

    Arthur Schlesinger, advisor to President Kennedy, confirms Drozniak's previous telegram report that " In [Schlesinger's] opinion, the assessment of the Soviet installation of the missiles in Cuba as the attempt to strengthen the [world] position of the USSR before a possible confrontation over Berlin, ended up prevailing within the US administration."

  • October 31, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to USSR Ambassador to Cuba A. I. Alekseev

    Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko cables the Soviet Embassy in Havana that the Soviet leadership had decided to allow UNSG U Thant and his representatives to visit Soviet launchers sites in Cuba and verify that the launchers are being dismantled.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Representatives from Brazil and Yugoslavia discuss the Brazilian proposal to the United Nations (1) denuclearization of Latin America, 2) Cuba will not interfere politically with its neighbors, and 3) guaranteed sovereignty for Cuba), about various leader's opinions on the resolution and about the difficulty that might be involved in the implementation of these policies.

  • October 31, 1962

    Air Letter from Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro

    An air letter from Mexican Embassy describing Brazil's role as the mediator of the Cuban crisis, the dismantling of Cuban nuclear weapons bases, and the role of the UN in this conflict.

  • October 31, 1962

    Soviet Report on the American Preparation of War During the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Report on the American mass media and preparations for war. "Washington is engulfed in an atmosphere of war hysteria."

  • October 31, 1962

    Gromyko Cable to Ambassador Alexeev to Havana of October 31

    Gromyko instructed Alexeev to present to Fidel Castro the Soviet draft protocol which should be used as a basis for negotiation at the UN. The Protocol concerns issues such as the removal of blockade, the renunciation of invasion against Cuba, the respect of Cuban sovereignty, the termination of subversive activity against Havana, the reestablishment of diplomatic and economic relations with Cuba, and the Guanatanamo base.

  • October 31, 1962

    Minutes, Meeting of Italian Communist Party (PCI) Politburo

    The Italian Communist Party (PCI) Politburo discuss recent events in Cuba: the revolution, US invasion of Cuba and the international political situation.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Jaszczuk thinks that the public announcements that the US will not invade Cuba are a good start, but that they need to be "encapsulated in some kind of an international document."

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Based on the conversation between Paszkowski and Deputy Director of United States Department in the Ministry of International Affairs Sergey Kudryavstev, Jaszczuk describes the situation between the US, the USSR and Cuba after the recent talks and says that "We need to wait a few days for the results of the talks regarding Cuba" to take effect.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Israeli Embassy in Havana (Prato), to Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem

    Prato and Pinto discuss Brazilian efforts to pursuade Cuba to accept inspectors as well as what a potential U.S. attack would mean for diplomatic relations in the region.

  • November 01, 1962

    Mikoyan Cable to Central Committee of the CPSU about his conversation with US Permanent Representative to the UN Stevenson

    Mikoyan reported his conversation with US Representative to the UN Stevenson. The issues discussed include: An American non-aggression commitment against Cuba, the removal of the "quarantine", the methods for control of dismantling and dispatching of missiles, the normalization of relations between the US and their Latin American allies with Cuba, the liquidation of the US base in Guantanamo, the US proposal to remove ground-air missiles from Cuba, and the preliminary agreement between the US and the USSR over the issues to be discussed by the Security Council.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry, Belgrade, to Yugoslav Embassies in Havana and Washington and the Yugoslav Mission to the United Nations, New York

    The Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relays to its embassies a summary of the Brazilian proposal on the Cuban Missile Crisis which, they say, mainly includes: the denuclearization of Latin America with inspections, Cuba's commitment to not "export" revolutionary operations, and guarantees to Cuba for sovereignty and independence. Allegedly, Castro welcomed the idea of the above plan. Brazil thinks that the USA could accept it after negotiations.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan to CC CPSU re 1 November 1962 meeting with Stevenson

    Mikoyan discusses the results of a meeting with Stevenson. The two discussed the quarantine in Cuba, the dismantling of weapons, the possibility of the Soviets and Americans coming to agreements over the issues to be discussed by the UN Security Council and the possibility of normalization of relations with Cuba in the future.

  • November 03, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry to Yugoslav Embassies in Washington, Havana, Mexico, Caracas, and LaPaz, and Missions in Santiago de Chile, Montevideo, and New York City (United Nations)

    A message from the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry (originally, the embassy in Rio), saying that they are extremely satisfied with Tito’s message which contributed to Brazilian President João Goulart’s decisiveness on Cuban crisis.

  • November 03, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 3 November 1962

    Drozniak reports on the information from several sources on the Cuban Missile Crisis, particularly the White House and State Department's reactions to the agreement to dismantle the Soviet missiles in Cuba and the continued trouble they are having with Castro's refusal to allow UN inspections.